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Street Style by Ted Polhemus

Street Style by Ted Polhemus

15 GBP
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Street Style by Ted Polhemus
15 GBP
“Street style is my sartorial bible” – 

Chloe Sevigny in The New York Times.

132 Pages. 21 x 26 cm


Without the Hipsters, Teddy Boys, Beats, Rockabillies, Rude Boys, Mods, Surfers, Hippies, Punks, B-Boys, Ravers, Harajuku Girls - and all the other streetstyle originals – most of us would be left without anything to wear. But the sharp suits, leather jackets, jeans, kaftans, flares, DMs, slick locks and so forth are only the visible, tangible part of this legacy. Oozing through the clothes, hairstyles, make-up and accessories is an attitude. An attitude which perhaps more than any other set the tone of life in the second half of the twentieth century and which shows no sign of dissipating in the twenty-first.

‘The Street’ is both the stage upon which this drama unfolds and the bottom line metaphor for all that is presumed to be real and happening in our world today. In the past, ‘Western Culture’ was most at ease and most recognisable within grand interiors. Today, as high culture has given way to popular culture in the 20th century’s most significant social revolution, it is the litmus test of ‘street credibility’ rather than that of class, which is crucial. If it won’t cut it on the corner, forget it.

First published by Thames and Hudson in 1994, Streetstyle has been a revelation right from its launch at London’s legendary V&A Museum, where the world’s most respected style pioneers toasted the birth of the world’s flagship styletribe tome.

This fully updated edition features nearly 100 extra pages with a four page bound insert, 5 new chapters, including over 250 compelling images, all packed into 224 devilishly stylish pages.

'We Can Be Heroes' Book by Graham Smith

'We Can Be Heroes' Book by Graham Smith

30 GBP
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'We Can Be Heroes' Book by Graham Smith
30 GBP
Punks, Poseurs, Peacocks and People of a Particular Persuasion

A fantastic book by PYMCA Photographer Graham Smith.

In the early 1980s, when a small group of misfits began acting out their nocturnal fantasies, London nightlife blossomed and fashion, music and clubbing would never be the same again. Against the backdrop of recession-hit Britain, this was the birth of club fashion, style magazines, futuristic synth pop and blue-eyed funk. Energised by punk's do-it-yourself attitude and David Bowie's ceaseless image shifting, a new generation of pop stars, designers, journalists, artists and filmmakers emerged, adopting wild, theatrical attire and an ethos of continual change. Led by the enigmatic Steve Strange and the ever dapper Chris Sullivan, their scene flourished in a succession of legendary clubs: from Billy's and the Blitz via Le Beat Route and the Mud Club, to the Wag and the Dirt Box. It gave us stars including Boy George, Sade and Spandau Ballet, as well as the faces who would shape London nightlife up to the rave era. The press dubbed these nightbirds the New Romantics; in truth this was just one stage of their endless reinvention. Together with his schoolmate, future broadcaster Robert Elms, and art-school buddy Chris Sullivan, Graham Smith was at the centre of this creative cult. He designed its record sleeves, cultivated its graphics and captured its characters, taking extraordinary pictures throughout the period, most of which have never been reproduced before. There are interviews with all the major players, incendiary and hilarious text by Chris Sullivan, an introduction by Robert Elms and forewords by Boy George, Steve Strange and Spandau Ballet's Gary Kemp. This beautiful book is the first insider account of this uniquely creative time.
Giles Moberly Print 30 x 40cm - Limited Edition

Giles Moberly Print 30 x 40cm - Limited Edition

50 GBP
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Giles Moberly Print 30 x 40cm - Limited Edition
50 GBP
An iconic 30 x 40cm Limited Edition Matt C-Type print of the rebellious Giles Moberly shot - 'A policeman using a megaphone, while a demonstrator makes fun of him, Criminal Justice Rally, Hyde Park, London UK 1994'.

Edition of 100.
Richard Braine Print 30 x 40cm - Limited Edition

Richard Braine Print 30 x 40cm - Limited Edition

50 GBP
Richard Braine Print 30 x 40cm - Limited Edition - 0
Richard Braine Print 30 x 40cm - Limited Edition
50 GBP
An iconic and exclusive 30 x 40cm Limited Edition Matt C-Type print of this stunning shot of Teenagers boxing by Richard Braine - 'Two teenagers boxing at Addison Boys' Club, Fulham, London, 1977'

Edition of 100.
Gonzales Photo Print 30 x 40 - Limited Edition

Gonzales Photo Print 30 x 40 - Limited Edition

50 GBP
Gonzales Photo Print 30 x 40 - Limited Edition - 0
Gonzales Photo Print 30 x 40 - Limited Edition
50 GBP
An iconic 30 x 40cm Limited Edition Matt C-Type print of a fantastic smokey stage shot - 'A singer and musician is pictured in silhouette live on stage during a live concert. Denmark 2013'.

Edition of 100.
'Out of Order' Book by Molly Macindoe

'Out of Order' Book by Molly Macindoe

30 GBP
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'Out of Order' Book by Molly Macindoe
30 GBP
PYMCA Photographer Molly Macindoe presents her fantastic book. Enshrouded in a protective box, it reveals an explosive series of imagery surrounding the underground free party and teknival scene since 1997.

Her photography ‘has always been inspired by the beauty to be found in the individuals, community, and spaces within the Free Party scene, and reflects that same sentiment.’

Controversial in her revisionist attitude, Macindoe’s work is a visual attack on the culture of voyeuristic sensationalism found in the mainstream media. She chooses to portray a very personal narrative with a positive outlook. From a true insiders perspective, she is redressing the balance, and in the process is producing a work that is more than just an art book, but a social documentary of significant historical and academic value. This book sparks a debate on the issue of social responsibility in documentary photography, provoking thought on the further consequences of published work and the ethics of the profession.

The four hundred plus photographs are accompanied by a dual narrative text, which describes the parallel stories of both the photographer and the underground rave scene, written by musicologist and journalist Caroline Stedman.

See No Evil: The Book

See No Evil: The Book

20 GBP
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See No Evil: The Book
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The second See No Evil street art and graffiti event in Bristol attracted more than 50,000 people to the city centre in August 2012 to watch more than 45 international artists use 3,500 cans of spray paint on 12 multi-story buildings and other sites.

This book documents the whole event, including the block party and DJs as well as the painting.
Skins by Gavin Watson

Skins by Gavin Watson

13 GBP
Skins by Gavin Watson - 0
Skins by Gavin Watson
13 GBP

Skinheads. The single most important photographic record of this unique subculture is Gavin Watson’s Skins, now proudly released as a brand new edition on Independent Music Press, complete with over 30 new and previously unpublished photographs. The scores of black and white shots offer a fascinating glimpse into a skinhead community that was multi-cultural, tightly knit and above all else, fiercely proud of their look. These are classic photographs of historical value.

Perhaps one of the most reviled yet misunderstood of all the youth subcultures, the skinhead look and lifestyle has now rightly returned to the very forefront of contemporary youth culture. While celebrities and sportsmen shave their heads for the red carpet, the underbelly of British youth culture has rediscovered the look via acclaimed films such as 2007’s award-winning This Is England. The look is now more fashionable than it has ever been. The single most important photographic record of this unique subculture is Gavin Watson’s Skins, now proudly released as a brand new edition on Independent Music Press, complete with over 30 new and previously unpublished photographs. The scores of black and white shots offer a fascinating glimpse into a skinhead community that was multi-cultural, tightly knit and above all else, fiercely proud of their look. These are classic photographs of historical value.

Gavin Watson is an acclaimed documentary and portrait photographer who grew up in the tough council estates and back-streets depicted so grittily in the stunning images contained within Skins. His collection of work is one of the UK’s finest documentary portfolios. His photographs have appeared as billboard images for Dr Martens, in countless music magazines and music TV channels, as album cover artwork and in fashion bibles such as i-D and The Face plus numerous high profile exhibitions.


Paperback: 128 pages

Don't Call Me Urban! - The Time of Grime by Simon Wheatley

Don't Call Me Urban! - The Time of Grime by Simon Wheatley

30 GBP
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Don't Call Me Urban! - The Time of Grime by Simon Wheatley
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While Time of Grime roots itself in the Grime music scene it is considerably more than a Music Book for the fans of a certain genre. Through the prism of Grime, Simon has developed a body of work on urban youth that is a significant document of life in modern Britain. By moving beyond The Scene and into the lives of the people; their homes, their families, their environment, their relations with the police and the broader community, in a way that is neither condescending nor promotional, he has produced an honest and bitter-sweet document of our time that should continue to have significance long after the moments of its making. - Chris Steele-Perkins

"Don't Call Me Urban!" is the definitive contemporary documentary record exploring one of the biggest social issues in the UK - drug use, the wayward behaviour of deprived black (and white) youth - it is the only book to give an unbiased account of a significant and vibrant genre of music in the UK and abroad. The pictures in Wheatley's book are unique and, unlike similar books, feature ordinary people as well as the people that have emerged to bring the ethos of grime to the attention of a wider audience. The book analyses the culture of 'grime' that has burst out of London's decaying council estates over the past decade. Although ostensibly a genre of 'urban' music, acknowledged as the UK's answer to hip hop, the author sees 'grime' as an era when youths living in these deprived areas began to behave in an increasingly wild manner. These youths live a fantasy largely based on an 'urban' culture imported from the USA, where Simon believes rap music has degenerated from an originally 'conscious' base to one in which the 'gangsta' strain that emerged in the late 1980s/early 1990s is now dominant. "Don't Call Me Urban!" seeks to cut through the perceived glamour of 'urban' culture and document through photographs and stories what is the social reality of being black (and white) on a London council estate, where 'urban' music - specifically the culture of emceeing and rapping - has become a standard means to communicate and express feeling. The mindless postcode warfare that now plagues London, and is the cause of many of the sudden wave of teenage killings, can be seen to have roots in the confrontation of east and west coast in US hip hop. Simon Wheatley gained the trust of the key figures in the grime culture who allowed him to capture the harsh elements of the street with its raw violence and drug taking as well as the more intimate and tender moments of their lives. The portraits and commentary from the likes of Dizee Rascal, Wiley, Jammer, Skepta, Fumin', P Money, Flirta D and Kano make "Don't Call Me Urban" a contemporary and definitive account of a culture which remains a frightening mystery to many. The title takes its inspiration from the objection to the word 'urban' that many black youths feel.

Hardcover.

 232 pages.

I PREDICT A RIOT by  Jane Stockdale

I PREDICT A RIOT by Jane Stockdale

17 GBP
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I PREDICT A RIOT by Jane Stockdale
17 GBP

I PREDICT A RIOT is the first book by Scottish photographer Jane Stockdale published by Koenig Books that documents the day in 2009 when the City of London came to a stand still.

As world leaders including Obama, Medvedev, Hu Jintao, Merkel, Sarkozy and Berlisconi descended on London for the G20 summit, so did thousands of protesters.

The G20 summit fell at a time when emotions were riding high about a multitude of injustices and brought people from all walks of life to the streets. The motives behind the protests were varied; the economic crash, the war on terror, climate change or anger at the banks and city bonuses, but the message was unite – people had had enough.

As the media declared “Meltdown in the City” and “The Summer of Rage”, city workers were advised to dress down, cancel meetings or work from home. Over 16,000 police were called in to protect key areas across London in what was one of the biggest security operations since World War Two.

This book documents what happened that day outside the Bank of England…

Softcover: 68 pages.